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Get Moving to IPv6: IPv4 ARIN Depletion Approaches


Director of Architecture

If you are still waiting to deploy IPv6, you’re waiting too long. You need to turn on IPv6 connectivity to your services, and you need to do it now.

There’s been some recent news about IPv6 because Apple is making IPv6 a requirement for App Store submission as of iOS 9. But that’s not why IPv6 support is critical. IPv6 support is critical because we’re effectively out of IPv4 addresses.

In the Asia-Pacific region, they ran out of “free pool” addresses in 2011. In Europe, it was 2012. Latin America and the Caribbean ran out last year, and North America will run out any day now—probably
later this month. Africa still has some left, but network infrastructure there is not as strong as it is in the rest of the world. None of this “free pool” exhaustion means that there are absolutely no addresses left, but it does mean that they’re not plentiful and you can only get them if you don’t already have any.

IPv6 is no longer hard to do. On many devices it just works. Your customers already prefer IPv6 when it is available. Your future customers are going to come to you over IPv6 only, because there isn’t
more IPv4 to go around. If you are only available on IPv4, that means that your customers will get to you through some IPv6-IPv4 translation layer. That means more latency and possibly that things break in
surprising ways. Don’t wait until your customers see problems! Fix your network today.

For more information about IPv4 and IPv6, take a look at our infographic:

As a fellow at Dyn, Andrew Sullivan concentrates on the architecture of Internet systems, working on Internet standards, protocols and policy. In his more than 15 years in the business, he has focused on DNS, Internet standards and internationalization, systems architecture and databases, but not always that order. Follow us and like us to get involved in the conversation.

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